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Philosophy of Religion: Home

Philosophy of religion is the branch of philosophy that inquires into the nature of the divine, and includes topics such as: the problem of evil, religious experience, miracles, and arguments for or against the existence of God.

Introduction

"To the majority of those who have reflected deeply and written about the origin and nature of the universe, it has seemed that it points beyond itself to a source which is non-physical and of great intelligence and power." —John Lennox 

How To Use This Guide

Introduction

This guide has been constructed to aid students who are new or unfamiliar with the sources available to them through the SEBTS library in the field of philosophy of religion. General topics include: the problem of evil, religious experience, miracles, and arguments for or against the existence of God.

The field of philosophy of religion enjoys a variety of contributors from different religious (or non-religious) backgrounds. It is different from the field of theology, in the sense that theology begins with a certain understanding of God that is typically rooted in a form of revelation—be it natural or special. Unlike theology, philosophy of religion examines religious claims from the outside in, instead of from the inside out (for example, theology might seek to explain the significance behind a miracle, whereas philosophy of religion is more interested in explaining whether or not miracles are credible). Philosophers of religion then seek to justify or invalidate certain religious claims on the basis of rational inquiry.

Where to start

The tab labeled Dictionaries, Encyclopedias, & Anthologies is an excellent place to start for students who are looking for a quick overview of a research topic. From there, it is useful for students to be familiarized with relevant Journals, Articles, & Databases provided by the SEBTS library. Journal articles are an excellent academic source that students can utilize for the purpose of furthering knowledge in a specific topic and engaging in the scholarly discourse currently taking place in a particular field. Finally, this guide provides a basic list of book resources available to students who are doing research in popular topics in philosophy of religion or Christian apologetics. The lists and topics are not an exhaustive display of the resources provided by SEBTS. Rather, the purpose of these lists is to provide a starting place for students who are beginning the research process in a new field. The topics have been selected based on popularity. 

A special thanks to Dr. Greg Welty for providing resources and feedback for this guide.